Faculty Webpages

Name:Dr. Nathan Strong 

nstrong

Title:Anthropology Faculty
School/Location:Alameda
Phone:(510) 748-2319
E-mail:nstrong@peralta.edu
Office/Classroom:C-107/C-109

 

Awards and Recognition:

Nathan Strong was Selected for “Who’s Who Among America’s Teachers” in 2005 and 2006.

– In recognition of his extraordinary teaching efforts, Dr. Nathan Strong, an anthropology instructor at College of Alameda, has been selected for inclusion in the 2004 and 2005 editions of Who’s Who Among America’s Teachers . This honor is bestowed on only five percent of the nation’s educators each year and Strong who has been teaching on and off at the Peralta Colleges since 1988 is among them.

My Courses

Enroll in Spring 2012 Classes of ANTHR 1:

evolution_human_skulls_bg

10:00 – 10:50 A.M., Monday, Wednesday, and Friday

11:00 A.M. – 11:50 A.M., Monday, Wednesday, and Friday

6:00 – 8:50 P.M., Wednesday Evening

Materials

College of Alameda

Spring 2012

Dr. Nathan Strong

Tel: 510-748-2319

Introducton to Physical Anthropology (Anthr 1)

Course Description:

This course considers the biological basis of human evolution, cultural difference and genetic variation within the human species.

Specific areas of focus in this class will be: The evolution of human biological structures; genetic inheritance and those cultural selection factors which contribute to human variation and change.

Course Objectives:

Students who complete Physical Anthropology should understand and appreciate the phenomenal legacy of human evolution and understand its implications for a variety of social domains and circumstances. They should also be able to understand and explain the role of biological or cultural factors in shaping human morphology and behavior. Each student will be able to define and fully comprehend the concepts of evolution, natural selection, adaptation, fossilization, population genetics, human variation, and cultural ecology upon completion of this class.

Student Learning Outcomes:

Course Level Student Learning OutcomesAssessment Methods
1. Compare and contrast the progressive evolutionary stage of human biological structures.Examination and group project report
2. Analyze the genetic inheritance and selection factors which contribute to human variations and change.Ancestral DNA testing project
3. Compare and contrast the biological and behavioral evolution of non-human primatesExamination and group discussion
4. Critically analyze the components of forensic methodology I pale anthropology and modern medicine.Term project paper

Grading Policy:

The final grades will be determined by students’ performance in class discussions, short quizzes, research project, midterm and final examinations. Class participation will be worth 10%. The short quizzes are worth 25%, and the term project is 15%. The midterm examination will be 25%, and the final examination 25%. Class assignments must be on time. If late, they will be reduced one letter grade.

Required Textbook:

Jurmain, Robert; Kilgore, Lynn; Trevathan, Wenda; Nelson, Harry. Essentials of Physical Anthropology (8th Ed.) Wadsworth/Thomson: U.S.A., 2009

Chapter 1 Introduction to Physical Anthropology

Key Terms

AdaptionHypothesis (hypotheses)
AnthropologyMetabolism
AnthropometryMicroevolution
Applied AnthropologyMacroevolution
ArtifactsOsteology
BehaviorPaleoanthropology
Biocultural evolutionPaleopathology
BipedallyPredisposition
CulturePrimates
ContinuumPrimatology
DNAQuantitatively
EmpiricalRelativistic
EthnocentricSavanna
EthnographiesScience
EvolutionScientific methods
Fornsic anthropologyScientific testing
GeneticsSpecies
HominidaeTheory
Hominids

Suggested Internet Exercises

@ Visit the American Anthropological Association’s website: http://www.aaanet.org to learn more about the discipline of anthropology. What non-academic careers are available for anthropologists? (Use the link http://www.aaanet.org/careers.html).
@ Visit website for the American Association of Physical Anthropology:http://www.physanth.org. What careers are available to physical anthropologists? (Use the link http://www.physanth.org/careers).
@ Browse website the “Talk Origins Archive” http://www.talkorignis.org for answers to frequently asked questions such as 1). Isn’t evolution just a theory? 2). Don’t you have to be an atheist to accept evolution? 3). If evolution is true, then why are there so many gaps in the fossil record? Shouldn’t there be more transitional fossil? 4). Where can I find more material on the Creation/Evolution debate?

Chapter 2 The Development of Evolutionary Theory

Key Terms

Christian fundamentalistsTransmutation
FertilityReproductively isolated
Fixity of speciesReproductive success
Natural selectionSelective pressures
Binomial selectionFitness
TaxonomyBiological continuity
CatastrophismGenome
Uniformitarianism

Suggested Internet Exercises

@ Visit the National Center for Science Education’s website, http://www.ncseweb.org, and read about creationist attempts to teach “creation science” in public schools.
@ Take a tour of Berkeley’s “Understanding Evolution”(http://www.evolution.berkeley.edu/) website. There are several topics to browse and cutting edge news from the field updated regularly.
@ Go to the University of California, Berkeley’s Museum of Paleontology website(http://www.ucmp.berkeley.edu/fosrec/Scott.html) for a discussion of antievolutionism.

Chapter 3 The Biological Basis of Life

Key Terms

Amino acidsMitochondrial DNA
AutosomesMitosis
CentromereMolecules
ChromosomesNondisjunction
CloneNucleotides
CodonsNucleus
ComplementaryOrganelles
CytoplasmPolymerase chain reaction (PCR)
Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA)Protein synthesis
EnzymesProteins
GametesRecombination
GeneRecombinant DNA
GenomeReplicate
HemoglobinRibonucleic acid (RNA)
HomologousRibosomes
HormonesSex chromosomes
Human genome projectSomatic cells
MeiosisTransfer RNA (tRNA)
Messenger RNA (mRNA)Zygote
Mitochondria (Mitochondrion)

Suggested Internet Exercises

@ Explore the official Human Genome Project suite of web site sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy http://www.ornl.gov/hgmis/.
@ Take an online visit to “The Human Cloning Foundation”http://www.humancloning.org/ and explore its content.

Chapter 4 Heredity and Evolution

Key Terms

Allele frequencyHybrids
AllelesLocus
AntigensMacroevolution
CodominanceMendelian traits
DominantMicroevolution
EvolutionPhenotypes
Founder effectPolygenic
Gene flowPopulation
Gene poolPrinciple of independent assortment
Genetic driftPrinciple of segregation
GenotypeRandom assortment
HeterozygousRecessive
HomozygousVariation (genetic)

Suggested Internet Exercises

@ Go online to the National Center for Biotechnology Information’s “Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man” website (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/sites/entrez?db=omim).
@ Go tohttp://www.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~kyperry3/Blue_Fugates_Troublesome_Creek.htmland read about the Fugates of Kentucky. What genetic condition is responsible for their remarkable skin color?

Chapter 5 Macroevolution: processes of Vertebrate and Mammalian Evaluation

Key Terms

Adaptive radiationGeological time scale
AnalogiesLocus
Ancestral (primitive)Homologies
Biological species conceptHomoplasy
ChordataInterspecific
CladisticsIntraspecific
CladogramPaleospecies
ClassificationPhylogenetic tree
Continental driftPlacental
Derived (modified)Punctuated equilibrium
EndothermicSexual dimorphism
EpochsShared derived
Evolutionary systematicsSpeciation
GenusVertebrates

Suggested Internet Exercises

@ Go online to the University of California, Berkeley’s Museum of Paleontology Hall of Mammals http://www.ucmp.berkeley.edu/mammal/mammal.html to better understand the evolution and classification of mammals.

Chapter 6 An Overview of The Living Primates

Key Terms

adaptive nicheMacaques
AnthropoloidsMidline
ArborealMorphology
Arboreal HypothesisNatal group
Binocular visionNeo-cortex
BrachiationNocturnal
CercopithecidaeOmnivorous
Coding DNAPrehensility
ColobinesPrimatologists
CuspsProsimians
DiurnalQuadrupedal
EstrusRhinarium
FrugivorousSensory modalities
HemispheresSexual dimorphism
IntelligenceSpecialized
Ischial callositiesStereoscopic vision

Suggested Internet Exercises

@ Visit web site http://pin.primate.wisc.edu hosted by the Wisconsin Regional Primate Research Center of the University of Wisconsin – Madison. Click on the “AV Resources” button on the left. Listen to numerous primate vocalizations (the gibbon “songs” and howler “howls” are particularly cool).
@ Go online to the Jane Goodall institute (http://www.janegoodall.org) and follow the link to “chimpanzee central.” Click the link for chimpanzee conservation and read about the threats facing wild chimpanzees.

Chapter 7 Primate Behavior

Key Terms

AffiliativeK-selected
AltruismIntragroup
AutonomicLife history traits
BehaviorMatriline
Behavioral ecologyMetabolism
Biological continuumPlasticity
CommunicationPolyandry
ConspecificsReproductive strategies
Core arear-selected
DisplaysSexual selection
Dominance hierarchiesSocial structure
EcologicalTerritories
Grooming

Suggested Internet Exercises

@ Go online to the Jane Goodall Institute (http://www.janegoodall.net/chimpanzees)to find out more about chimpanzee behavior.
@ Go online to the Human Behavior and Evolution Society (http://www.hbes.com). Follow the link “Intro to the Field” and choose one of the introductory readings.

Chapter 8 Hominid Origins

Key Terms

AramisLarge-bodied hominoids
ArtifactsMosaic evolution
AustralopithsMultidisciplinary
AustralopithecusObligate bipedalism
Australopithecus africanusOlduvai
BioculturalParanthropus
Bipedal locomotionPlio-Pleistocene
ChronometricPostcranial
CultureSagittal crest
FaunalSahelanthropus
Habitual bipedalismSectorial
HominidsSites
Homo habilisThermoluminescence

Suggested Internet Exercises

@ Visit website: http://www.becominghuman.org “Becoming Human: Paleoanthropology, evolution and Human Origins, an “interactive documentary experience: that lets you “journey throught the story of human evolution”.
@ Go to the Leakey Foundation website: http://www.leakeyfoundation.org/audio and click on the audio file called Donald Johanson (Lucy and the First Family, 1981). You will hear about one of the most famous paleoanthropological finds from the person who led the expedition.

Chapter 9 The First Despersal of the Genus Homo: Homo erectus and Contemporaries

Key Terms

AcheulianNuchal torus
BifacePleistocene
GradeZhoukoudian

Suggested Internet Exercises

@ Go to American Museum of Natural History interactive site about Atapuerca(http://www.amnh.org/exhibitions/atapuerca/). You can see the early Spanish fossils and the fascinating archaeological sites associated with some of the earliest European hominins. Try to identify differences in the explanations provided in your text and one the site. Why do you think that there is variability?
@ In infoTrac, keyword search “Homo erectus Pickrell” to read a Science News article written by J.l Pickrell on the very recent discovery of a H. erectus skull from Ethiopia dating to one million years ago. After reading the article, What are your oponions on whether or not H. erectus should be split into two different species: one from Africa called H. ergaster and the traditionally-named H. erectus from Asia?

Chapter 10 Premodern Humans

Key Terms

FlexedMousterian
GlaciationsLate Pleistocene
InterglacialsUpper Pleistocene
Middle Pleistocene

Suggested Internet Exercises

@ The Atapuerca sites, in northern Spain, hae yielded the largest collection of premodern human fossils from anywhere in the world. This collection of localities has recently been disignated a “World Heritage Site” by UNESCO. Reserchers from the “HUman Paleontology Group” of the Universidad Complutense in Madrid have designed an excellent set of web pages that take you throughout the sites and display the fossils(http://www.atapuerca.tv)
@ The “Neanderthal Museum.” opened in 1996 in the Neadner Valley of Germany, commemorating the recovery of the first Neanderal specimen 140 years earlier. Take a virtual tour of the museum at http://www.neanderthal.de

Chapter 11 Homo sapiens sapiens

Key Terms

AtlatlCro-Magnon
AurignacianMagdalenian
Burin

Suggested Internet Exercises

@ Visit “Peter Brown’s Australian and Asian Paleoanthropology” site to view imagesand learn boutthe Australian early modern human fossil evidence. Each important fossil is pictured and thoroughly discussed by Dr. Brown, Associate Professor of Archaeology and Paleoanthropology at the University of New England, Australia. Brown’s site:http://www-personal.une.edu.au/~pbrown3/palaeo.html.
@ A useful sit ethat brings together “under one roof” viarious resources, images, and links concerning the appearance of our species is C. David Kreger’s “A Look at Modern Human Origins.” Kreger’s purpose for the site is to help “students of paleoanthropology in the process of research, and to provide a source of information for any layperson who may or may not have access to the requisite background or general information needed to come to a fuller understanding or human evolution.”(http://www.modernhumanorigins.com/).

Chapter 12 Approaches to Understanding Modern Human Origins

Key Terms

Biological determinismIntelligence
Breeding isolatesLactose intolerance
ClinePolymorphism
EthnocentrismPolytypic
EugenicsPopulation Genetics
Gene poolSlash-and-burn agriculture
Hardy-Weinberg theory of genetic equilibrium

Suggested Internet Exercises

@ Take a look at Syracuse University’s “All of Us Are Related, Each of Us is Unique” cyber-exhibition “exploring the concept of race.” (http://allrelated.syr.edu/) After reading the descriptive blurb on the first page, click on teh “View the Exhibition” button towards the bottom right. That will take you to a page that display thumbnails of all 18 panels of the exhibition. Before cycling through them, open up another brower window and click on “Full Text Panels i-18”. This will alow you to view the panels in one window while switching back-and-forth with the other so you can read the full text associated with each panel. How do the perspectives in this exhibition agree tith those of your text?
@ Go to the PBS website:(http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/rxforsurvival/series/diseases/tuberculosis.html). and read about the continuing world wide health problem called tuberculosis. Click on the videos and learn about the efforts that Drs. Jim Yong Kim and Paul Farmer are making to help reduce deaths from drug resistant forms of tuberculosis. For futher reading, we suggest the book “Mountains beyond Montains” by Tracy Kidder.

Chapter 13 The Anthropological Perspective on The Human Life Course

Key Terms

Adolescent growth spurtEndocrine gland
DevelopmentMenarche
Essential amino acidsMenopause
GrowthPleiotropic genes
Monzygotic twinsSenescence
Dizygotic twins

Suggested Internet Exercises

@ Read about the Fels Longitudinal /Sutdy at Wright State Universityhttp://www.med.wright.edu/lhrc/fels.html What are someof the methods that are used to study human growth and development? How is health studied in relation to growth and development?
@ Go to the Cente for Disease Control website:http://www.cdc.gov/nccdphp/dnpa/nutrition/index.htm and browse the aricles about “Nutrition for Everyone and Helth and Weight”. Are you surprised by the information that is presented? Is it something that you incorporate into your life? How do you think poor nutrition influences human populations in general?

Chapter 14 Lesson from The Past, Lessons for the Future

Key Terms

HoloceneSea ice maximum
MesolithicSea ice minimum
Neolithic

Suggested Internet Exercises

@ Go to the companion website: http://www.climatecrisis.net/ of the film”An inconvenient truth” to see a trailer and read sone moer about the science behind the film.
@ Go to the United Nations Population Division World Population Prospects databasehttp://esa.un.org/unpp/ Select Population in the first panel and Africa and Europe in the second panel. You will see the populations of Africa and Europe from 1950 to the 2020. What do you notice about the rate of increase in population size between these two geographic areas? How does this information fit in with what you read in the chaper?

Anthropology Secondary Research Paper Guidelines

  1. Research topic
    1. Research Topic
    2. Research objective/incentive(s)
    3. Theory(s) or Hypothesis formulated
  2. Background(s) of researcher(s)/author(s)
  3. Research sample population(s)
    1. Representativesness
    2. Randomness
    3. Samples size
  4. Research design(s) used
    1. Content validity
    2. Face validity
    3. Reliability
    4. Compilation/interpretation of date
  5. Conclusion(s)Assessment of research process and findings

This course considers the biological basis of human evolution, cultural differences and genetic variation within the human species. Specific areas of focus in this class will be: The evolution of human biological structures, genetic inheritance and the cultural selection factors which contribute to human variation and change. Additional areas of inquiry will be primatology, forensic methodologies; and paleopathology, the study of ancient diseases.

The primary goal of Anthropology 01 is to provide an introduction to those basic concepts of physical anthropology and the study of key biological aspects of human beings as a species. This goal implies the development of a working understanding of the scientific method, of hypothesis theory testing and the implications for evidence-driven assessments of data in a variety of domains. Course material will focus on the process of evolution in general and each stage of human evolution in particular. These efforts will also distinguish between the biological and cultural aspects of human behavior or experience. Readings, lectures, and discussions of this material should provide students with an opportunity to critically interpret a wide range of information related to this particular scientific field. An understanding of physical anthropology provides the foundation for an enhanced ability to assess the behavioral and biological factors that have shaped the survival of human beings.

Introduction to Social and Cultural Anthropologyface

Enroll in Spring 2012 Classes of ANTHR 3:

9:00 – 9:50 A.M., Monday, Wednesday, and Friday

Materials:

College of Alameda

Spring 2012

Dr. Nathan Strong

Tel: 510-748-2319

Social and Cultural Anthropology (Anthr 3)

 

Course Description:

This class is a survey course in Cultural Anthropology. We will consider both the traditional and contemporary aspects of several cultures in terms of linguistic and social interaction theory, social change, and structural organization. We will also give major consideration to contemporary political, economic and technological trends and the consequent impact on traditional social institutions within divergent cultures.

 

Course Objectives:

  1. To introduce students to basic principles of anthropological theory, history and research.
  2. To demonstrate the extensive variability of human behaviors and perceptions.
  3. To consider effective strategies of interaction with peoples from cultures different from our own.

Student Learning Outcomes:

COURSE LEVEL STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMESASSESSMENT METHODS
1. Appreciate cultural anthropology’s unique position as a holistic disciplineGroup discussion and presentation
2. Define and analyze the concept of culture.Examination and project paper

3. Critically assess anthropological techniques and their application to pressing contemporary problems.

Examination and project paper

4. Demonstrate the awareness of ethnocentric bias and appreciate the cultivation of tolerance

Group discussion, project and presentation

Grading Policy:

Final grades will be determined by students’ performance on: class participation will be worth 10% and short quizzes will be weighed at 25%. The research project will be worth 15%; the midterm and final examinations are worth 50% (25% each). Class assignments must be on time. If late, they will be reduced one letter grade.

Required Textbook:

Ember, Carol R. and Ember, Melvin. Cultural Anthropology (13th Ed.) Prentice Hall: New Jersey, 2009

Chapter 1 What Is Anthropology

Key Terms

Anthropological linguisticsHistorical linguistics
AnthropologyHolistic
Applied (practical) anthropologyHuman paleontology
ArchaeologyHuman variation
Biological anthropologyPaleoanthropology
Cross-cultural researcherPrehistory
Cultural anthropologyPrimates
CulturePrimatologists
EthnographerSociolinguistics
EthnohistorianStructural (or descriptive) linguistics
EthnologyFunctionalism
FossilsStructural functionalism

Suggested Internet & InfoTrac College Edition Exercises

@ Visit web sit of the Canadian Museum of Civilization athttp://www.civilization.ca/aborig/aborige.asp
@ Check out the various sections and interest groups of the American Anthropological Association at web site http://aaanet.org

Chapter 2 Culture and Culture Change

Key Terms

AdaptiveNorms
Culture relativismRandom sample
EthnocentricSociety
EthnocentrismSubculture
Maladaptive

Suggested Internet & InfoTrac College Edition Exercises

@ Why do you think body piercing has become more common? Explorehttp://www.upenn.edu/museum/Exhibits/bodmodintro.html
@ Check out an article and other related sites at http://www.cs.org/publications to know what one anthropologist thinks
@ Visit the site of the Hopi Tribe Cultural Preservation Office:http://www.nau.edu/%7Ehcpo-p/

Chapter 3 History of Theory in Anthropology

Key Terms

Behavioral ecologyindividual selection (p-value)
Cultural ecologyPolitical economy
diffusionprimary institutions
ethnosciencesecondary institutions
evolutionary biologysociobiology
evolutionary psychologyspecific evolution
functionismstructuralism
general evolutiontheoretical orientation
group selectionhermeenutics

Suggested Internet & InfoTrac College Edition Exercises

@ Go to http://www.researchnavigatgor.com and enter your LOGIN NAME and PASSOWRD. For instructions on registering for the first time, please view the detailed instructions at the end of Chapter 1.
@ Using ContentSelect select “Ahthropology.” Search for an article that includes a discussion of one of the theorists mentioned in this chapter. Summarize the article and give an example of one of the following: 1) how the theoretical approach of that person was used by the author; 2) how and why the theorist was mentioned; or 3) how research was derived from the theoretical approach.

Chapter 4 Explanation And Evidence

Key Terms

explanationlaws
falsificationmeasure
fieldworkoperational definition
hypothesesstatistically significant
participant-observationtheoretical construct
probability value (p-value)variables
sampling universestatistical association

Suggested Internet & InfoTrac College Edition Exercises

@ Go to www.researchnavigator.com and enter your LOGIN NAME and PASSWORD. For instructions on registering for the first time, please view the detailed instructions at the end of Chapter 1.
@ Using Link Library go to the Cultural Anthropology section of anthropology. Using the Anthro-Tech site find a Web site devoted to enthnography and find one related to cross-cultural research (Go to the Human Relations Area Files site). How are they different and similar?

Chapter 4 Explanation And Evidence

Key Terms

explanationlaws
falsificationmeasure
fieldworkoperational definition
hypothesesstatistically significant
participant-observationtheoretical construct
probability value (p-value)variables
sampling universestatistical association

Suggested Internet & InfoTrac College Edition Exercises

@ Go to www.researchnavigator.com and enter your LOGIN NAME and PASSWORD. For instructions on registering for the first time, please view the detailed instructions at the end of Chapter 1.
@ Using Link Library go to the Cultural Anthropology section of anthropology. Using the Anthro-Tech site find a Web site devoted to enthnography and find one related to cross-cultural research (Go to the Human Relations Area Files site). How are they different and similar?

Chapter 5 Communication and Language

Key Terms

CodeswitchingMorphology
CognatesNon-verbal communication: body language, eye contact & proxemics
Core vocabularyPara-language: pitch, tone, speed & cadence
DialectsPhone
EthnolinguistsPhonemes
EthnolinguistsPhonemes
Historical linguisticsPhonology
Lexical contentStructural (or descriptive) linguistics
MorphSyntax: vocabulary, grammar & dress
Morpheme

Suggested Internet & InfoTrac College Edition Exercises

@ Search the site http://whyfiles.org/ for articles about language.
@ Explore http://www.friesian.com/egypt.html to learn the pronunciation of some ancient Egyptian language.
@ Read the introduction on the Bemba language and Cherokee on the sitehttp://www.yourdictionary.com/grammars.html.

Chapter 6 Getting Food

Key Terms

Cash cropHorticulture
CommercializationHunting and gathering
Extensive or shifting cultivationIntensive agriculture
Food collectionPastoralism
Food productionPrairie
ForagersSlash-and-burn

Suggested Internet & InfoTrac College Edition Exercises

@ Visit http://www.fao.org/ and read one of the featured stories relating to food.
@ Visit web site:and explore some recipes from differenct parts of Africa. How do the recipes compare with what you used to?

Chapter 7 Economic Systems

Key Terms

Balanced reciprocityOptimal foraging theory
CorvéePeasants
Generalized reciprocityPotlatch
General-purpose moneyReciprocity
Kula ringRedistribution
Market or commercial exchangeSpecial-purpose money

Suggested Internet & InfoTrac College Edition Exercises

@ Explore website: http://www.un.org/esa/sustdev/.
@ Visit website: http://www.ex.ac.uk/~RDavies/arian/amser/chrono15.html. to learn about the monetary systems of ancient times.

Chapter 8 Social Stratification: Class, Ethnicity, and Racism

Key Terms

CasteRace
ClassRacism
Class societiesRank societies
Egalitarian societiesReligious affiliation
EthnicitySlaves

Suggested Internet & InfoTrac College Edition Exercises

@ Visit website: http://www.researchnavigator.com and enter your LOGIN NAME and PASSWORD. For instructions on registering for the first time, please view the detailed instructions at the end of Chapter 1.
@ Read the U.S. Census Bureau’s report on the changes in inequality in the United States from 1947 to 1998 at website: http://www.census.gov/hhes/www/p60204.html.

Chapter 9 Culture and the Individual

Key Terms

EnculturationProjectie tests
Personality integration of cultureSecondary institutions
Primary institutionsSocialization

Suggested Internet & InfoTrac College Edition Exercises

@ Ethos (http://www.aaanet.org/committees/minority/ch2.htm) What is ethos? What function does ethos play in anthropology?

Chapter 10 Sex, Gender, and Culture

Key Terms

Compatibility-with-childcare theoryPrimary subsistence activities
Economy-of-effort theorySecondary subsistence activities
Expendability theorySex differences
Gender differencesSexually dimorphic
Gender rolesStrength theory
Gender stratification

Suggested Internet & InfoTrac College Edition Exercises

@ Go online to the National Center for Biotechnology Information’s websitehttp://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/
@ Visit website: http://www.trinity.edu/mkearl/gender.htmlto learn Gender and Society.Explaing the opening quotation by Immanuel Kant. What is meant by the statement…”gender is a social construct?”
@ Visit website: http://www.swc-cfc.gc.ca/ to learn about the status of women and their changing role in Canada.

Chapter 11 Marriage and the Family

Key Terms

Bride price (or bride wealth)Levirate
Bride serviceMarriage
Cross-cousinsMonogamy
DowryNonfraternal polyandry
EndogamyNonsororal polygyny
ExogamyNuclear family
Extended familyParallel cousins
FamilyPolyandry
Fraternal polyandryPolygamy
Group marriagePolygyny
Incest tabooPostpartum sex taboo
Independent familySororal polygyny
Indirect dowrySororate

Suggested Internet & InfoTrac College Edition Exercises

@ Sociology of the Family (http://www.trinity.edu/~mkearl/family.html). Explain the lead quote by Michael Novak.
@ Polygyny http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Polygyny. What is polygyny? Who practices it and how? How prevalent is it now and how prevalent was it in teh past? What are the advantages of this practice?
@ Go to website: http://www.census.gov/apsd/www/statbrief/ and read at least one article on child care in the United States.
@ Explore website: http://www.umanitoba.ca/faculties/arts/anthropology/tutor/ to learn the marriage patterns in one of the ethnographic examples given in the Kinship and Social Organization tutorial.

Chapter 12 Marital Residence and Kinship

Key Terms

Affinal kinMatrilineal descent
Ambilineal descentMatrilocal residence
Avunculocal residenceMoiety
Bilateral kinshipNeolocal residence
Bilocal residencePatriclans
Clan or sibpatrilineage
Classificatory termPatrilineal descent
Consanguineal kinPatrilocal residence
Descriptive termphratry
Double descent or double unilineal descentRules of descent
EgoSiblings
KindredTotem
LineageUnilineal descent
MatriclansUnilocal residence
Matrilineage

Suggested Internet & InfoTrac College Edition Exercises

@ Sex, Gender, and Kinshiphttp://vig.prenhall.com/catalog/academic/product/1,4096,0132065339,00.html What topics are delineated in this study? Why do you think so
@ The Dogon Society(http://http://lucy.kent.ac.uk/eTHNOaTLAS/Hmar/Cult_dir/Culture.7840) Wht are the residential patterns and family household patterns of the Dogon?
@ Look at website: http://www.nndata.no/home/jborgos/jborgose.htm for a description of Norwegian naming and how it relates to genealogical reconstruction.
@ Learn more about Kinship and social organization using the interactive website athttp://www.umanitoba.ca/faculties/arts/anthropology/kintitle.html.

Chapter 13 Associations and Interest Groups

Key Terms

Achieved qualitiesunisex association
Age-gradeuniversally ascribed qualities
Age-setVariably ascribed qualities
Associations

Suggested Internet & InfoTrac College Edition Exercises

@ The Ganda Society(http://http://lucy.kent.ac.uk/eTHNOaTLAS/Hmar/Cult_dir/Culture.7841) What is the relationship between the king and his kingdom? How does this help him rule?
@ The Bahia-Brazilians(http://http://lucy.kent.ac.uk/eTHNOaTLAS/Hmar/Cult_dir/Culture.7830) How are occupations classified into class structures?

Chapter 14 Political Life: Social Order and Disorder

Key Terms

AdjudicationNegotiation
BandOath
Band OrganizationOrdeal
ChiefRaiding
ChiefdomState
Codified lawsState organization
CrimeTribal organization
FeudingTribe
HeadmanWarfare
Mediation

Suggested Internet & InfoTrac College Edition Exercises

@ The Cagaba Society(http://http://lucy.kent.ac.uk/eTHNOaTLAS/Hmar/Cult_dir/Culture.7835) Who is mama? How many Mamas can there be? How does the Mama exercise judicial authority?
@ The Santal Society(http://http://lucy.kent.ac.uk/eTHNOaTLAS/Hmar/Cult_dir/Culture.7866) How are the pargana and the Parganath related in areas of judicial concern?

Chapter 15 Religion and Magic

Key Terms

Ancestor spirits Priests
AnimatismReligion
AnimismRevitalization movements
Divinationrituals
GhostsShaman
GodsSorcery
MagicSpirits
ManaSupernatural
MediumsTaboo
MonotheisticWitchcraft
Polytheistic

Suggested Internet & InfoTrac College Edition Exercises

@ Visit Modern Wiccan religion website: (http://www.conjure.com/COG/). “What is the Goddess?” Is modern witchcraft a cult?
@ Africa: Belief Systems: Indigenous, Islamic, Christian(http://www.igc.apc.org/worldviews/awpguide/) What percentage of Africans still follow indigenous religions? Have Christianity and Islam replaced indigenous AFrican vlues?

Chapter 16 The Arts

Key Terms

RepetitionFolklore
SymmetryPolyphony

 

Cultural Functions of Art:

  • The political-social-religious-economic institutions of human cultures have historically been the major or sole patrons of all art forms and artists within most societies.
  • Historically, these have been the exclusive sources of influence, support and inspiration for different definitions and expressions of art.
Symbolic Constructions of Art:

  • Historical and contemporary realties.
  • The spiritual and supernatural.
  • The meaning(s) of life, death and eternity.
  • Love and sexuality.
  • Aesthetic norms and ideals.
  • Ethical and moral ideals.
  • Social order and power.
Traditional Art Forms:

  • Chanting and song.
  • Rhythmic movement and dance.
  • Fine arts: drawing-carving-ceramics.
  • Rituals and ceremony.
  • Body art.
Contemporary-Convergent Art Forms:

  • Computer art.
  • Electronic media.
  • Commercial art, advertising and political persuasion.

Suggested Internet & InfoTrac College Edition Exercises

@ The Memphis Museum of Egyptian Art – Color Tour of Egypt (http://www.memphis.edu/egypt) Why is Egyptian art so large?

@ Pomo Basketry http://www.kstrom.net/isk/art/basket/bascalif.html Why is Pomo basketry so elaborate? What is the function ofthis artistic basketry?”

Chapter 17 Applied, Practicing, and Medical Anthropology

Key Terms

AIDS (Acquired Immune Deficiency)ethnomedicine
Applied anthropology or practicing anthropologybiomedicine
Cultural resource management (CRM)Forensic anthropology
medical anthropology

Suggested Internet & InfoTrac College Edition Exercises

@ Read the articletitled”Smallpox: The Triumph Over the Most Terrible of the Ministers of Death” at the following website:http://www.annals.org/content/127/8_Part_1/635.full. How is tis story a form of applied anthropology?
@ Review the website for the Society of Applied Anthropology at the following website:http://www.chttp://www.sfaa.net/sfaaethic.html. Summarize their ethnical standards. Why are these important?.
@ Review the following website:http://www.rice.edu/projects/HispanicHealth/Courses/mod7/susto.html. Why is this disease of interest to anthropologists?

Chapter 18 Global Problems

Key Terms

Terrorism

Suggested Internet & InfoTrac College Edition Exercises

@ Explore website: http://www.reliefweb.int and read bout ReliefWeb in the Resources section. Click on Natural Disasters at the left side of the reports on a natural disaster.
@ Visit website: http://www.mincava.umn.edu and read articles on child abuse, domestic violence, or elder abuse.
@ Go to Web site http://www.cdc.gov and click on Youth Violence and read about incidence of youth violence in the U.S. and the possible factors involved.

Anthropology Secondary Research Paper Guidelines

  1. Research topic
    1. Research Topic
    2. Research objective/incentive(s)
    3. Theory(s) or Hypothesis formulated
  2. Background(s) of researcher(s)/author(s)
  3. Research sample population(s)
    1. Representativesness
    2. Randomness
    3. Samples size
  4. Research design(s) used
    1. Content validity
    2. Face validity
    3. Reliability
    4. Compilation/interpretation of date
  5. Conclusion(s)Assessment of research process and findings

The basic goal of Anthropology 03 is to provide a background in cultural anthropology; so that students will be able to approach their own work and other experiences with an anthropological point of view. This goal implies the development of a working knowledge of the concept of culture and an awareness of the significance of cultural variation in different social settings and situations. Students should become aware of the relativity of human values, and the roles that culturally defined values play in affecting the actions of individuals and groups. Students should improve their capacities to think critically about their own values, ideas and assumptions; as well as those values, ideas, and assumptions that might underlie the behavioral norms of other cultures. The development of this critical approach is applicable to other academic and professional domains; particularly in an international, multicultural context. An anthropological perspective can be viewed as the ability to study other cultures objectively and to withhold pre-judgment until essential evidence is brought to bear in analyzing comparative economic, political or religious differences.

Students who complete Anthropology 03 should be able to define the concept of culture and understand how it applies to a variety of social domains and circumstances. They should be able to understand and discuss the role of culture in shaping all relationships between human beings and to their physical, biological or social environments.

Introduction to Physical Anthropology Laboratorydna_test_swab_s05

Enroll in Spring 2012 Classes of ANTHR 3:

1:00 – 4:50 P.M., Friday

Materials:

College of Alameda

Spring 2012

Dr. Nathan Strong

Tel: 510-748-2319

 

Introduction to Physical Anthropology Lab (Anthr 1L)

 

Course Description:

This course provides an adjunct laboratory practicum and requisite perspective for students who have completed/ are currently taking the Introduction to Physical Anthropology lecture class (Anthr. 001). It also meets present University of California or California State University articulation/transfer standards and College of Alameda A.A. degree requirements for the Natural Sciences.

 

Course Objectives:

Upon completion of this course, the student will be able to:

  1. Demonstrate an extensive understanding of the structure and functions of the mammalian body.
  2. Describe and discuss the full range of primate behaviors.
  3. Explain the concepts of encephalization quotient and cephalic index identification.
  4. Explain the role of cranial/post cranial human evolution and the role(s) of biological factors in shaping human morphology and behaviors.
  5. Define and fully comprehend the concepts of evolution, natural selection, adaptation, fossilization, population genetics, and human variation.
  6. Critically interpret a wide range of information related to this particular scientific field and several related areas of the biological sciences.
  7. Understand basic principles of “the Scientific Method.”
  8. Demonstrate basic competencies in Mitochondria DNA/Y chromosome/ Genetic marker analysis.
  9. Demonstrate basic competencies in Virtual laboratory analysis of human and Non-human anatomy.

 

Student Learning Outcomes:

Course Level Student Learning OutcomesAssessment Methods
1. Discuss the workings and functions of the mammalian body.Group discussion and presentation
2. Describe and discuss the full range of primate behaviors.Examination and zoo field trip report

3. Explain the role of cranial/post cranial human evolution and the role(s) of biological factors in shaping human morphology and behaviors

Examination and project paper

4. Each student will be able to define and fully comprehend the concepts of evolution, natural selection, adaptation, fossilization, population genetics, and human variation, upon completion of this class.

Group discussion, term project paper and ancestral DMA project

Grading Policy:

The final grades will be determined by students’ class participation—5%, complettion of weekley laboratory exercises and submission of relevant self-tests 30%, Primate Center project report 10%, midterm and final examinations (20% each)—40% and term project 15%. Class assignments must be on time. If late, they will be reduced one letter grade.

 

Required Textbook:

Kappelman, John; Virtual Laboratories for Introductory Physical Anthropology CD-ROM (4th Ed.); Thomson Learning, 2005

Additional Resources

Ancestral DNA Workshops

group standing around watching mouth swap for dna testing
ANCESTRAL DNA WORKSHOP: Now Available to the Public
Date and Time: To be determinedPlace: Student Lounge, “F” Building of College of Alameda (555 Atlantic Ave., Alameda)
Registration fee: $150.00
For registration call (510) 748-2352 or more information call (510) 748-2319
Download registration form

Since January 2005, The College of Alameda, has provided cutting edge technologies and instruction to its Anthropology students; concerning their genetic histories and the bio-geographic origins of their distant ancestors. After successfully providing this opportunity for over 800 College of Alameda students, faculty and community members; our Anthropology Department is now extending an open invitation to all local residents throughout the East Bay Community, who would like to know what modern science can reveal about our fascinating ancestral origins and their extraordinary evolutionary and migratory journeys over the past 50,000 to 100,000 years.

In collaboration with one of the largest and most prestigious ancestral DNA testing laboratories in the United States, the C.O.A. Ancestral Workshops utilize very current technologies that far exceed the comprehensiveness of recent Y chromosome or Mitochondrial DNA analysis.

“Explore the cutting Edge with C.O.A.”